Traffic cones: Helping with safety or becoming hazards?

On Behalf of | Aug 5, 2022 | Workers' Compensation

Traffic cone placement is very important, because a misplaced traffic cone can be dangerous for you and those around you. If you’re working in construction and have to be on the roads, a stray construction cone could quickly become a hazard if it’s hit and comes your direction.

Poorly placed construction cones can cause crashes and end up becoming a real threat to your construction team. That’s why it’s so important to check the placement of cones each day and to address problems with cones as they come up.

Traffic cones keep you safe, but they can be hazardous, too

In most cases, traffic cones help keep you safe. They reroute traffic and make it so that cars and trucks have to keep a distance from you. They are brightly colored to draw attention to your work and make sure traffic starts to slow down within the construction zone.

A good tapering strategy is a must when rerouting traffic. Initially, having a few cones every few feet might be enough, but as you get closer to where you’re working, the cones should get closer together. If you’ll combine cones with barriers, a firm line is key to showing drivers not to enter the work area.

Equal cone placement makes a consistent barrier, too. If a cone is pushed out of place, a driver might think there is an opening and accidentally enter the work zone.

Traffic cones can become hazardous when they’re not placed correctly or when they’re hit. One that is propelled into the work area by an impact could hit you or impact machinery or supplies.

What do you do if you’re injured because of a traffic cone?

If you’re hurt at work, you can look into making a workers’ compensation claim. A good claim will help you seek the money you need to focus on your health and recovery. You may seek out lost wages, help with medical bills, support for vocational rehabilitation and more. If you’re injured, let your employer know as soon as possible, so you can make your claim and start the healing process.

 

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