What kinds of injuries might qualify for workers’ compensation?

On Behalf of | Dec 29, 2021 | Workplace Injuries

Whether you suffer one injury which is serious enough to send you to the hospital or your injury develops over time, you need help. Workers’ compensation is there to help you while you cannot work.

Work injuries and workers’ compensation claims may happen in almost every industry. Even though it looks like only workers who do heavy work file claims, anyone in any industry can be hurt.

What is a “work-related injury?”

An injury that happens while you are working qualifies you for workers’ compensation payments. If your job requires you to drive for most of the day, you qualify for workers’ compensation if someone hits your work vehicle. This would not happen if you were in an accident in your car as you were going to work or leaving work.

If your job requires you to make the same motions many times during the day, you can suffer a repetitive stress injury. You can receive workers’ compensation payments while you are at home, recovering.

Some of the injuries you could suffer on the job

Workers can receive injuries affecting any part of their bodies. What kind of work they do does not matter. If you are injured and need medical help to get better, these benefits can help you and your family.

Some of the injuries can include:

  • Back, neck or spine injuries
  • Repetitive stress injuries
  • Chronic pain
  • Brain trauma
  • Psychological injuries
  • Death benefits

What workers’ compensation covers

Workers’ compensation pays medical benefits and wage-loss payments so you can receive medical attention and keep paying your bills. If you suffer from a disease that is related to your work, you could receive benefits. One of the only requirements is that your illness or injury is related to your work.

If you had a medical condition before you were hired, this will not matter — if the injury you suffered happened at work, your employer’s insurance has to make payments that are reasonable and necessary.

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