Each year, data is collected by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics involving injuries and illnesses that occur in workplaces across the country. Large groups or businesses such as Allsup, a nationwide provider of Social Security Disability Insurance representation, analyze this data and make conclusions that help prompt legislative change.

It is no surprise that we mentioned Allsup above, because the company recently released a report that studied workplace injury rates. The study not only looked at the national rate, but also broke down the numbers by state and industry. According to this report, the rate of workplace injuries in Pennsylvania is just above the national level. 

The rate was determined by calculating the number of injuries or illnesses per 100 workers. The injuries that were considered were not simple broken fingers, small cuts or the common cold. The injuries and illnesses that were included were ones that caused the worker to transfer jobs or require restrictions.

For the nation, that meant a rating of 0.7 injuries or illnesses per 100 workers. For Pennsylvania, that rate increased by a point to 0.8 injury or illness cases per 100 workers. The state with the highest rate, at 1.4, was Maine.

As for industries, it was amusement parks and arcades that took the top spot with 3.2 cases per 100 workers in 2011. Shortly behind was animal slaughtering and processing, beverage manufacturing and foundries.

Allsup may provide representation for SSDI claims, but these require a disability that will last for more than one year. Although SSDI claims often go hand-in-hand with workers’ compensation claims, workers’ compensation provides benefits that help for injuries or illnesses that fall under that one year mark.

Whether it is a long-term injury or illness or one that requires a shorter period of recovery, a workers’ compensation attorney can help those who have suffered an on-the-job injury.

Source: Claims Journal, “Rates of Serious Workplace Injuries Vary Widely by State: Allsup Study,” Aug. 6, 2013