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You Shouldn't Have To Fight For Workers' Comp Benefits

Posts tagged "workers' compensation"

Safety practices in winter construction work

Construction workers in Pennsylvania face unique dangers on the job during the winter months. Freezing temperatures and slippery surfaces from ice and snow compel workers and employers to take extra safety precautions during winter, according to experts. Preparation for the oncoming cold can begin before winter.

Trenching projects pose a risk for workers

Work can be a dangerous place for construction workers in Pennsylvania and across the country. Because employees in construction handle heavy equipment and deal with incomplete structures, workplace accidents can be devastating. One area of construction is particularly dangerous for employees: trenching and excavation projects. The nature of these projects makes them vulnerable to cave-in and collapse, and too many employers don't abide by safety regulations. The number of fatalities on the job related to trenching projects has drawn concern at a federal level.

Being tired and stress is dangerous for workers

It is not uncommon for workers in Pennsylvania and elsewhere to feel tired on the job. According to a study from the National Safety Council, 69 percent of respondents said that they were fatigued while at work. It also found that all respondents who worked in construction said that they were at risk for being tired. Transportation workers often said that a lack of sleep and long hours at work lead to their fatigue.

OIG finds evidence of underreporting injuries, deaths to OSHA

In January 2015, some revisions that OSHA made to its injury and fatality reporting rule went into effect. Between that month and April 2017, employers reported 4,185 fatalities and 23,282 severe injuries. They conducted nearly 15,000 investigations to evaluate the causes of those injuries or deaths, and OSHA conducted over 10,000 of its own onsite investigations. Employers in Pennsylvania may think that these numbers are mostly accurate.

OSHA launches Focus Four Hazards campaign

Construction employees and employers in Pennsylvania are probably already aware of the "fatal four" hazards in their industry. For others who are interested, they are: falls, electrocution, caught-in-between incidents and struck-by incidents. Minimizing these is essential because the construction industry is among the most hazardous in the U.S. One in five worker fatalities in 2016 were on construction sites, according to OSHA.

Workplace safety and aerial lifts

Workers in Pennsylvania can face real hazards on the job that put them at risk for sustaining serious, long-term injuries. A lack of safety training and knowledge can lead to severe accidents and even deaths in some cases. For example, people who work on aerial lifts can be seriously hurt if they do not know how to operate them properly and in a safe manner. Every year across the country, around 26 workers lose their lives while using the lifts. There are many issues linked to these deaths on the job, including falls, electrocutions and tip-over incidents. In addition, workers have been trapped or crushed between the bucket or guardrail and another object.

Ways employers can reduce machinery injury risks

Working around machinery on Pennsylvania job sites can be dangerous due to how fast machines are capable of moving. If an accident involving heavy machinery does occur, any employees involved are at risk for experiencing severe injuries. However, there are some steps employers can take to reduce the risk.

Truck driving among the most dangerous jobs in America

There were 918 truck driver and sales drivers killed on the job in 2016 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The death toll was higher than any other occupation in the United States in that time period. Farmers and agricultural managers had the second most dangerous job in the country during that year as that sector recorded 260 deaths. Overall, 5,190 people died in Pennsylvania and throughout the country while at work in 2016.

How employers can reduce the risk of heat stroke

When temperatures rise, Pennsylvania employees who work outside or in workplaces that do not have temperature-controlled environments, they may be at risk for heat stroke. In some cases, heat stroke can be fatal, especially when the temperatures soar into the high 80s and 90s. However, fatal heat stroke can still occur even when the Heat Index is below 91 degrees Fahrenheit.

Understanding the definition of work-related injuries

Workers in Pennsylvania can face a range of injuries and accidents on the job, and under the Workers Compensation Act, employers are responsible for the medical risks of employment. In order to be considered a work-related injury, the health condition or accident must occur while a worker is engaged in the tasks of employment for the benefit of the employer. This does not mean that the injury must have taken place on the company's premises in order to qualify for workers compensation benefits.

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